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Elsa and Oscar Gomez pose with Matthew Hinsley, executive Director of the Austin Classical Guitar Society, and Rosalba Ojeda, appointed as Consul General of Mexico in Austin. The couple twice hosted receptions at their West Lake home for the association's recitals.

Elsa and Oscar Gomez pose with Matthew Hinsley, executive Director of the Austin Classical Guitar Society, and Rosalba Ojeda, appointed as Consul General of Mexico in Austin. The couple twice hosted receptions at their West Lake home for the association’s recitals.

By Jazmine Ulloa
Austin American-Statesman

She was the sister of a Mexican ex-governor: a woman with a bold sense of style and the looks of a television starlet. He introduced himself as a Mexican businessman but divulged nothing about his business or how he made his millions.

The couple had a modernist, white house built with lofty glass doors and a pool in the Preserve at Lost Gold Cave, a small, gated community in the Westlake area. They played hosts to other Austin socialites and invited guitarists from all over Latin America to perform intimate concerts in their spacious living room.

But for all their keeping up appearances and displays of wealth, Oscar and Elsa Gomez were said to have left Austin without a trace one night last year. Many friends and neighbors had not heard anything about them — until an indictment unsealed last month in Corpus Christi linked the couple to organized crime.

Authorities say Oscar Gomez ran an unlicensed money transmitting business that laundered millions of dollars for his wife’s brother, Eugenio Hernández Flores, the former governor of the Mexican border state of Tamaulipas.

The allegations against Oscar Gomez are part of at least two dozen cases to emerge out of Texas federal courts in recent years implicating officials at the highest levels of Mexican government, many of whom are accused of taking funds from what has become the most violent criminal organization in the country, the Zetas.
Full story.