916.695.6882; jazmineulloa@gmail.com

Magazine and newspapers published from the mini publishing empire that was my old Macbook. A collection of the best clips from my summers and semesters as an intern. And other good stuff.

Abroadly Speaking

Volume II, Spring 2008

Volume II, Spring 2008

I helped found Abroadly Speaking with three other students our freshman year at the University of Texas at Austin. The student-run magazine was sponsored by the school’s Study Abroad Office with the mission of increasing and diversifying the study abroad student body. Over three years, we received funding to produce 1,500 print copies of the first issue and 3,500 copies of each of the following two issues. As editor in chief from 2006 to 2009, I wrote articles, gathered and edited photos and stories from more than two dozen contributing writers, and designed all three issues and promotional materials.
To read the Spring 2008 issue click here.
To read the Spring 2009 issue click here.

ADELANTE

March 2008 issue

Adelante was created in the Fall of 2006 by the Hispanic Student Journalists Association at the University of Texas at Austin with the goal of covering Latina/o issues often overlooked by traditional media outlets.

As editor in chief, I wrote, edited, shot photos and designed pages. By Spring 2008, I organized a team of four to cover the U.S.-Mexico Border Fence in Brownsville, Texas. At the time, increased border security since 9/11, the passing of the Secure Fence Act of 2006 and the simmering demand for immigration reform had shifted the nation’s focus to its southern border. The negative debates were affecting all Latinos – regardless of their legal status – and often dehumanized the “in-between” place many call home. We set out to produce a print and web issue to counter the prevailing narrative.
Check out our work here.

Lurch and a lifeline 37 floors up

By Jazmine Ulloa
The Boston Globe

A pair of window washers at the peak of a Financial District skyscraper yesterday morning were jolted from their perch when their platform abruptly pitched downward, leaving them dangling 37 floors above the street and banging the windows for help.
Full story.

Bus drivers, company caught in labor battle

By Jazmine Ulloa
The Boston Globe

A controversy that has captured the attention of the Chinese community is pitting a group of bus drivers against a well-known Hong Kong-born businesswoman.

The 10 drivers say they were forced to work longer hours than the government allows for Sunshine Travel Services and then let go after protesting pay cuts. But Lorraine Tse, owner and founder of the Chinatown company, has denied the allegations, with the labor feud escalating in recent months to dueling news conferences and a lawsuit – all played out in Chinese-language newspapers.
Full story.

Rings among few clues in woman’s death

By Jazmine Ulloa
The Boston Globe

One ring marks the promise to marry, another the honor of that promise held true. And the last, a 10-karat band with heart-shape settings and three birthstones, is the keepsake of a mother. What once symbolized three joyous stages in a woman’s life have become some of the only pieces law enforcement officials have to put together the story of her death.
Full story.

Women play major roles in the drug trade

By Jazmine Ulloa
The Brownsville Herald

At the lowest level of the illegal drug trade are cases like that of Laura Trevino, her mother and two sisters.

The four women arrested in June allegedly stashed approximately 37 pounds of cocaine packages inside “girdles” three of them wore underneath their clothes. Authorities said they attempted to smuggle the narcotics through the B&M International Bridge.Court testimony later revealed Trevino had admitted to organizing the operation and would be paid $2,000 after they had crossed into the United States, a small percentage of the nearly $1 million estimated street value of the drugs.

The case was the first of its kind in the Rio Grande Valley. But among the roles women play in the illegal drug business, a majority of them, like Trevino and her family, still take a huge risk for a small cut of their load’s worth.
Full story.

Restaurants taking no risks with salmonella outbreak

By Jazmine Ulloa
The Brownsville Herald

When customers ask Fidela Montelongo whether she serves tomatoes, she points to a large eraser board hanging on a wall of her restaurant. In red letters, it reads in Spanish:

“If you wish for tomato to be served with your food, please ask for it…for your health.”

Montelongo, owner of Refresqueria and Taqueria Montelongo on Southmost Boulevard, isn’t the only restaurateur in Brownsville to take the red fruit off the menu after a multi-state salmonella outbreak was linked to raw Roma, red plum and round red tomatoes.
Full story.

Shrimpers head to Mexico to fuel boats

By Jazmine Ulloa
The Brownsville Herald
 
Fuel prices have more than doubled since 2001, when Pedro Purata bought a 16,000-gallon shrimp boat he dubbed the “Alma Marie.”

The wooden boat, coated in layers of peeling black and white paint, now rocks gently on the bayou waters – moored to the dock along with more than half of the Port of Brownsville’s shrimp boats. Although some need repairs, most simply lack the fuel to head to Louisiana, where shrimping season has begun.

But before the Texas coast kicks off its shrimp season July 15, Purata and many other shrimpers along the Gulf of Mexico’s coastline say they are sailing south.
Full story.

East Austin Stories

Eastside Pride
Perla Arpero is a senior at the recently re-named Eastside Memorial High School. Eastside is a troubled school fighting for its existence and that has a profound effect on the students. Perla talks about her hopes for her school and her community. Made by Jazmine Ulloa and Rita Chapa.

La Botánica
John Cazeras is the owner of the Green and White. This East Austin landmark has changed roles over time. Formerly a neighborhood grocery store it now offers more esoteric goods, from herbs and incense to lucky candles and arcane artifacts. His clientele is growing. La India or La Mistica is one of his regular customers. She also has her own business in the store. She can break a curse or give you a reading. A film by Caitlin Diaz, Araceli Jaime, Lauren Pruitt, and Jazmine Ulloa.

Abroadly Speaking

Volume II, Spring 2008

I helped found Abroadly Speaking with three other students our freshman year at the University of Texas at Austin. The student-run magazine was sponsored by the school’s Study Abroad Office with the mission of increasing and diversifying the study abroad student body. Over three years, we received funding to produce 1,500 print copies of the first issue and 3,500 copies of each of the following two issues. As editor in chief from 2006 to 2009, I wrote articles, gathered and edited photos and stories from more than two dozen contributing writers, and designed all three issues and promotional materials.

To read the Spring 2008 issue click here.
To read the Spring 2009 issue click here.

Adelante

Adelante was created in the Fall of 2006 by the Hispanic Student Journalists Association at the University of Texas at Austin with the goal of covering Latina/o issues often overlooked by traditional media outlets. A new and unique voice on campus, the small staff of eight operated out of a single laptop.

As editor in chief, I wrote, edited, shot photos and designed pages. By Spring 2008, I organized a team of four to cover the U.S.-Mexico Border Fence in Brownsville, Texas. At the time, increased border security since 9/11, the passing of the Secure Fence Act of 2006 and the simmering demand for immigration reform had shifted the nation’s focus to its southern border. The negative debates were affecting all Latinos – regardless of their legal status – and often dehumanized the “in-between” place many call home. We set out to produce a print and web issue to counter the prevailing narrative.

Check out our work here.